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  • Sensational Grave Find in Cypriote Bronze Age City

    [9 Aug 2016] An archaeological expedition from the University of Gothenburg has discovered one of the richest graves from the Late Bronze Age ever found on the island of Cyprus. The grave and its offering pit, located adjacent the Bronze Age city of Hala Sultan Tekke, contained many fantastic gold objects such as a diadem, pearls, earrings and Egyptian scarabs, as well as more than 100 richly ornamented ceramic vessels. The objects, which originate from several adjacent cultures, confirm the central role of Cyprus in long-distance trade.

  • Belgian Professor of Linguistics this year's Honorary Doctor

    [13 May 2016] Hubert Cuyckens, Professor of English Linguistics at the University of Leuven, Belgium, has been appointed Honorary Doctor at the Faculty of Arts, University of Gothenburg.

  • New Interpretation of the Rök Runestone Inscription Changes View of Viking Age

    [2 May 2016] The Rök Runestone, erected in the late 800s in the Swedish province of Östergötland, is the world's most well-known runestone. Its long inscription has seemed impossible to understand, despite the fact that it is relatively easy to read. A new interpretation of the inscription has now been presented - an interpretation that breaks completely with a century-old interpretative tradition. What has previously been understood as references to heroic feats, kings and wars in fact seems to refer to the monument itself.

  • Critical heritage studies as global challenge

    [29 Apr 2016] On the 21st of April, the newly established Centre for Critical Heritage Studies (CCHS) was launched ceremoniously at the University of Gothenburg. An important goal for the center is to study how cultural heritage are perceived and used in different arenas today. The research aims to provide critical alternatives for the future.

  • Water storage made prehistoric settlement expansion possible in Amazonia

    [28 Apr 2016] The pre-Columbian settlements in Amazonia were not limited to the vicinities of rivers and lakes. One example of this can be found in the Santarém region in Brazilian Amazonia, where most archaeological sites are situated in an upland area and are the result of an expansion of settlements in the last few centuries before the arrival of Europeans. This is concluded by a research team consisting of archaeologists from the University of Gothenburg and Brazilian colleagues.

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