Till startsida
Sitemap
To content Read more about how we use cookies on gu.se

News

  • Radiocarbon dates show the origins of megalith graves and how they spread across Europe

    [11 Feb 2019] How did European megalith graves arise and spread? Using radiocarbon dates from a large quantity of material, an archaeologist at the University of Gothenburg has been able to show that people in the younger Stone Age were far more mobile than previously thought, had quite advanced seafaring skills, and that there were exchanges between different parts of Europe.

  • Oldest ever traces of the plague found in Falköping

    [6 Dec 2018] In a 5,000 year old grave outside Falköping, scientists have found the oldest traces of the plague bacterium's DNA in the world. An international research team including archaeologists from the University of Gothenburg made the discovery using advanced DNA techniques. According to the researchers, this discovery may also have identified the first pandemic in history which stretched from Europe across to Asia as a result of the new trade routes in this period.

  • Spanish newspapers described Lagerlöf as motherly and traditional

    [29 Nov 2018] She was called "grandma" and considered the epitome of "the Scandinavian race". Research from the University of Gothenburg shows how Spanish newspaper described Selma Lagerlöf after she received the Nobel Prize in 1909.

More news

Page Manager: Eva Englund|Last update: 8/21/2015
Share:

The University of Gothenburg uses cookies to provide you with the best possible user experience. By continuing on this website, you approve of our use of cookies.  What are cookies?