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  • Exhibition result of CCHS Hidden Sites residency in the House Mill

    [5 Jun 2019] The exhibition concludes Cecilie Gravesen's artist residency in The House Mill, funded by the research cluster Curating the City - UCL/University of Gothenburg Centre for Critical Heritage Studies (CCHS). It examined the role of heritage management and creative practice in making historic places matter to contemporary Londoners.

  • The solution to sustainability problems might be found in our history

    [29 May 2019] What can today¿s societies learn from the past when it comes to sustainability? According to archaeologist Christian Isendahl, we can learn a lot from studying how cultures in the past responded to climate change, for example. He is the lead editor of a new anthology of works by over 50 international researchers focusing on what lessons we can learn from the really long-term perspective.

  • Mats Malm new Permanent Secretary in the Swedish Academy

    [26 Apr 2019] Mats Malm, Professor in Comparative Literature at the University of Gothenburg, is appointed new Permanent Secretary in the Swedish Academy. "The effort to change the Academy has come a long way, and that effort will continue," says Mats Malm.

  • Best English thesis of the year goes to Malin Brus

    [16 Apr 2019] We congratulate this year's 2019 SWESSE Award for BA Thesis of the Year in English Literature winner Malin Brus. Her essay "I Don¿t Think We¿ve Been Formally Introduced?" Re-contextualising a Literary Model for First Meetings through Adaptation Theory and Fan Fiction" is based on Cassandra Clare¿s Young Adult novel City of Bones (2007), and the spin-off film and TV-series.

  • Radiocarbon dates show the origins of megalith graves and how they spread across Europe

    [11 Feb 2019] How did European megalith graves arise and spread? Using radiocarbon dates from a large quantity of material, an archaeologist at the University of Gothenburg has been able to show that people in the younger Stone Age were far more mobile than previously thought, had quite advanced seafaring skills, and that there were exchanges between different parts of Europe.

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Page Manager: Eva Englund|Last update: 4/16/2019
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